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Noisy tenants who won’t stop making noise can be evicted

On Behalf of | Dec 24, 2021 | Residential Real Estate |

It is 10:30 on a school night in your Florida community. A tenant in one of your apartment complexes calls you to tell you, again, that their upstairs neighbors are still making noise.

After you and your tenant hang up, you consider your options. Should you just evict the noisy tenant right away? Or should you give him another warning. Florida eviction law is helpful to landlords — as long as you work within the law.

Noisy tenants? You have the right to control their noise 

Your noisy tenant may be playing loud music or the volume of their television is too loud. Their children may run constantly inside the apartment, adding to the noise level for the tenant living beneath them.

When an irritated tenant calls you, begin by investigating the noise complaints. What time did the noise start and how long did it last. How many times has it happened? Have they spoken to the noise-making tenant? Next, speak to your noise-making tenant. They may not realize their noise can be heard outside their unit — or they do not care.

Follow Florida landlord-tenant law

While you might want to get rid of your noise-making tenant tomorrow, that does not comply with Florida law. At the same time, you want to give some relief to your other tenants so they can sleep.

Take this process in steps. Speak to the tenant and give them a warning. If they persist in their noisy habits, let them know they are risking being evicted.

Remind your loud tenant that chronic noise can result in eviction

if the noise continues, a reminder that chronic noise can result in eviction is in order. Speaking to your other tenants might help you to see how big the problem is.

Consider a clause in your lease about noise-making and quiet hours. This can protect you if eviction becomes a necessity.

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